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US Supreme Court hands victory to blind man who sued Domino’s over site accessibility

Adam

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Came across this today, seems interesting:
 
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Gummibeer

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vikas chauhan

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I may add, as we have tool like chrome audit running on lighhouse
we need to sometime check the contrast ratio as well.
But, the problem is whether it good from the point of view of a designer.
There should be a balance.
For trusted players, it is easy to implement accessibility because they are providing value through their service or product or in other form and already well known.
If we change the color of Call to action Button text to black instead of white, the contrast ratio will be best and so accessible
but it may kill the impact from designer point of view.
 

Gummibeer

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One common case, a lot of departments/ministries do is to add special buttons for sign language, larger text, contrast mode and so on.
By providing multiple CSS files and adding classes to html/body element it's easy to achieve this. So far I know this is legal as long as these switches itself are accessible (keyboard only reachable, high contrast and so on). This is a common way to provide an accessible fancy page.
 

Gummibeer

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Not the first tweet by him that brings the important things to mind: naming, usecase & accessibility.
And even if I now tend to get ~100 points on accessibility by Google lighthouse I see how much is possible, missing and that accessibility is more than simple alt/aria/focus things.
 

kylejrp

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My problem is that there aren't any developer tools, which I know, to really test a site as blind, color-blind or whatever.
I don't know of any automated tools, but the latest Firefox has color vision deficiency testing tools: