GDPR / DSGVO

GDPR / DSGVO

Gummibeer

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We should probably start a thread for this instead of hijacking this one, but I feel like GDPR was a good idea. It gave us the right to be forgotten after all (which I've used more than once with Google for my old 10yo stuff) and a way to at least know what data is getting stored about us. It may be a PITA to implement but worth it IMO.
Done 😉

 

Gummibeer

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I agree that being able to let services delete data is great. But this was already possible before.
GDPR has mainly introduced only confusion. We had a working and years old privacy and data processing law. Now no one knows what's allowed. This primary destroys small companies/businesses because they can't pay multiple lawyers. So it's again the opposite what it should be.
I know multiple photographers who have closed their business because of GDPR because it already applies for the images saved on SD card. Independent if they are uploaded somewhere or not.

 

Gummibeer

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I personally have no problems with the introduction of GDPR. 🤐
In this case you don't use ANY third party service or aren't GDPR compliant. The major problem are the missing judgements that you can refer to.

 

Michael

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I think some of that's down to lack of understanding of the law… Fundamentally it's a law built to protect the consumer, and I'm 100% behind this. I think the advantage of GDPR is that it's made it standard across everything, some places didn't have to let you delete data, and some chose to let you.

Also, the implementation of GDPR in most scenarios wouldn't have been that difficult. The biggest thing is that most places forgot/didn't realise they couldn't just assume opt-in to marketing, they had to explicitly ask people to opt-in.

A lot of the negatives about it came from marketing companies that were probably doing things they shouldn't have been doing getting told they can't do that anymore.

 

Gummibeer

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They are possibly the loudest. But the loosers are one man businesses, small businesses and the developers who have to implement it.
They main task to be done is a whole book of privacy agreement updates including every single thing that could get in touch with the customer data.

And if it would only apply to websites I would be fine. But my landlord can't give my data to a Craftsman without my signature. A wedding/concert photographer has to hand out privacy agreements to every guest and let them sign it. This is the state if you do what's in the law. If the courts will handle it different isn't clear. And the big players, who are the real target, just pay hundreds of lawyers and some fines but don't care at all. At the end I would have to reject all emails except a whitelist because I use gSuite and if the sender hasn't agreed to my privacy terms I'm not allowed to process his data - which receiving an email is ...

So I don't complain about what GDPR was planned to do. I complain about the implementation and the results. And that there wasn't any difference between Facebook/Google and the little bakery around the corner.

 
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Gummibeer

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James

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Ahh I hate GDPR.. Actually we don't acquire UK traffic due to the compliance complications!

 
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