Absolute Beginner in JavaScript

Absolute Beginner in JavaScript

darylmalibiran

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Hi,

I would like to learn JavaScript the right way (not sure if there's a wrong way ✌😅).

I'm in love with the websites since I was in College although this is totally not the course is all about. I am designing websites using Photoshop and Illustrator then, I'm building them using HTML and CSS only. I am currently creating websites using the said programs, WordPress and the help of page builder. Yes, I can achieve the clients' requirements for their websites but I know I am missing something. Some functions that should be done and I guess that's JavaScript should take the step.

I am currently studying the introduction of JavaScript.

What I'd like to asks are:

  1. Am I reading the correct website to learn JS?
  2. Can you please give me beginner tips about JS?
  3. I see, there's a lot of frameworks out there. Which one do you recommend the most?
  4. Anything else to say will be appreciated. :)
Thanks in advanced!

 

nick

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Congrats on making the first step!

1. I haven’t read that site so I can’t comment on it but I would start here on MDN.

2. The best way to learn is to try and complete a small task and learn the requirements along the way.

3. I recommend starting with jQuery. It’s so prevalent and there is a wealth of information available on the internet. The solution to most problems is Googleable.

4. Once you’ve gotten your feet wet, I recommend taking some computer science fundamentals courses online. Standford makes its Computer Science 101 course available for free.

Good luck!

 
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tiborsaas

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This is a great playlist:


We used this as a base material in a programming bootcamp where I taught JS.

Follow also MDN that Nick recommended, look up the concepts there too that you see in the playlist.

 

sri19

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Once you get a grip of the basics of the language (functions, conditionals, iteration etc.) my strongest recommendation would be to:

1. Start building a real-world web application
2. Start solving the "99 problems" algorithms set with JS

You'll be an expert in no time. But you'll also discover that there's so much more to learn. :)

 

fbnlsr

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3. I recommend starting with jQuery. It’s so prevalent and there is a wealth of information available on the internet. The solution to most problems is Googleable.

I'd have to disagree here. Starting with jQuery is prone to errors when people don't learn vanilla JavaScript first. Besides, jQuery is a dying framework, which is being replaced either by evolution from JavaScript itself or smaller libraries such as lodash.

Source: I teach JavaScript and whenever I introduce jQuery in my class people tend to go the easy route and forget about plain old JS. It'll bite their asses when a client/their boss ask them to code something without using jQuery.

My advice to OP would be to stick with vanilla JS and learn its intricacies, and go for es6 and later versions of the language. Learn how to use babel and/or Webpack to bundle their code, and then and only then move on to a framework such as React or VueJS.

As for resources, I loved CodeSchool (now PluralSight) and Gregg Pollak is now teaching at Vue Mastery.

 

Gummibeer

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Agree with @fbnlsr ! I've started with jQuery and it's easy as ****. But now I use more vanilla JS and see how it's bloated. And how big it is for nearly nothing you use.
Selecting elements is vanilla JS, Ajax replaced by fetch/axios and filter/template by lodash/underscore or your used SPA framework.
I hate frontend but I don't know why people combine jQuery with vue.js 😲🤔😔

 

nick

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Source: I teach JavaScript and whenever I introduce jQuery in my class people tend to go the easy route and forget about plain old JS. It'll bite their asses when a client/their boss ask them to code something without using jQuery.

That’s fair, however having some be extremely easy is a good thing when you’re first learning what conditionals are. As long as you move away from it once you understand 😛

 

basGo

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I'm with @sri19 on this one, once you have completed any of the basics tutorials that others have posted, the most effective way to improve quickly is to code something every day, even if it's a 30 minute exercise (or 30 minutes of a tutorial), you don't have to start a project right away.

The biggest mistake I see people make is trying to just do big chunks or coding on a project every other day or on weekends. I'm a senior and still solve at least one challenge a day on https://edabit.com/challenges

 
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jasonfry

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Seldom-given advice is to learn how to architect a web app either before learning javascript, or while learning it. It depends on your learning style. If the thought of sketching the blueprints of a house sounds more interesting than hammering in the nails, consider studying how to architect an app.

How to architect an app will depend on a lot (including what framework you're using and what the app does), but I think a good starting point is actually the elm-lang tutorial, which isn't javascript, but the language has an architectural style built-in, and the tutorial is very friendly. There is probably a better way to study architecting javascript, but I don't know any others because I haven't looked for any others yet.

 

Mayh

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Seldom-given advice is to learn how to architect a web app either before learning javascript, or while learning it. It depends on your learning style. If the thought of sketching the blueprints of a house sounds more interesting than hammering in the nails, consider studying how to architect an app.

I think you have right and I am trying this approach but it is very hard when you don't know basic things, I am webdesigner who want to make my own website and I have problems with everything :) I think I am learning a lot but its very hard when you read every day new words like lodash, gulp,json (that is easy), nunjucks etc ;)

 

joshmanders

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Wes Bos just released Beginner JavaScript course targeting people exactly like you. Beginner JavaScript

He's having a black friday sale that is going on for another 2 days where it's only $44 for the basic or $69 for the top tier, even without the sale, it's worth more than what he charges so I highly suggest getting it while discounted.

I've been doing this for 20 years and I still learn from Wes.

 

JacobHegwood

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Wes Bos just released Beginner JavaScript course targeting people exactly like you. Beginner JavaScript

He's having a black friday sale that is going on for another 2 days where it's only $44 for the basic or $69 for the top tier, even without the sale, it's worth more than what he charges so I highly suggest getting it while discounted.

I've been doing this for 20 years and I still learn from Wes.


I highly agree with Josh. Wes Bos is well-known in the web development industry, and I recommend a structured approach in the beginning rather than diving straight in with a project. You have to have a good understanding of the fundamentals in order to start any project. I learned more in a few minutes of a structured approach than searching through youtube videos for 2 years. The course would be worth every single penny.

 

jarod_peachey

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I learned JS from Brad Traversy at Traversy Media. He's got hundreds of free courses via Youtube, and he's also got paid $10 courses on tons of topics.


I would recommend the below course. It's $10, with over 20 hours of stuff, with projects. It's the one I took.


After that, I would recommend learning the JAMstack, which is Javascript, APIs and Markdown. GatsbyJS would be a great tool to use.

 
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